Demographic Dynamics of Peruvian Black Faced Spider Monkeys (Ateles Chamek) Reintroduced in the Peruvian Amazon

Published: May 4th, 2020

Category: Featured-Post, News, UFBI Graduate Fellows Research

 

Demographic Dynamics of Peruvian Black Faced Spider Monkeys (Ateles Chamek) Reintroduced in the Peruvian Amazon

By *Farah Carrasco-Rueda1 and Raúl Bello2

1School of Natural Resources and Environment, 103 Black Hall, PO Box 116455, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. Email: farahcarrasco@gmail.com
2Kawsay Biological Station – Taricaya Ecological Reserve. Puerto Maldonado-Perú. Email: perbello25@gmail.com

Abstract
Reintroductions of animals are important conservation tools for different taxa around the world. A reintroduction program
in the Peruvian Amazon is focusing on black-faced spider monkeys (Ateles chamek). We investigated life-history parameters
such as stage-specific survival and female fertility rates using a capture-mark-recapture framework and data from the literature.
We estimated growth rate and probability of extinction for a reintroduced group using matrix models, as well as testing
whether population growth depends more on survival of juvenile females or adult females. Our results suggest the population
of the reintroduced group is decreasing. After projecting the group size for the next 25 years using different scenarios,
we found that in order for the group to persist, survival rate of the female adult stage needs to exceed 79 %. Given that group
growth rate is more sensitive to the survival of adult females, management measures actions that target this demographic are
required to guarantee survival of the group. Extrapolations of our results are subject to restrictions imposed by the small
sample size and the conditions specific to this reintroduction program. However, this study may provide valuable lessons for
reintroduction programs attempting the recovery of wild populations of similar species.

To read the full article, published Neotropical Primates 25(1), December 2019, click here.

*Farah Caarasco-Rueda is an University of Florida Biodiversity Institute Fellow.

 

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